sioux falls

It's never too early to start thinking about Thanksgiving

Most Thanksgiving day cooks wait until the last minute to pick up a frozen turkey from Wal-Mart for $1.40/lb, just in time for the big day.

These people are making a sad, uninformed, mistake if you ask me.

Why is this a mistake?  Because that turkey was never let outside to enjoy the sunshine, chase grasshoppers, eat all kinds of plants, and get lots of good healthy exercise.

That turkey from Wal-Mart had its beak clipped so it couldn't cannibalize its brethren(really high stress environment), had the ends of its toes whacked off so it wouldn't hurt the people handling them(they have really powerful legs), was raised wing to wing with thousands of others, fed a strict diet of high protein feed to make them gain weight as fast as possible, and then likely had a long uncomfortable highway ride, huddled in a cramped cage to their ultimate demise.

I'm giving you the very best case scenario. Reality was possibly far worse when we take into account the tendency for calculated animal abuse in these operations. Also, not to mention the vaccines and drugs used to keep them on their feet so they could be sold.

No one really knows what you're serving your family when you buy from Wal-Mart.

Everybody knows how my turkeys were treated, raised, kept, etc... I'm a compassionate, transparent, husbandman and I love my animals.  I'll be sending you pictures and everything.

I get them straight from the hatchery, only provide unmedicated feeds, administer no vaccinations, give them freedom to roam, slaughter them as quickly and pain free as possible right on the farm, and inject no "flavor enhancing solutions" to improve their taste(none needed when raised correctly), and they keep all their toes and beaks until the very end.

So there it is folks, order from me and you'll have a clear conscience when you give thanks on Thanksgiving day with your friends and family.

 

I am ordering babies on the 13th of this month, order your turkey before then to secure one.  I won't have many extras, if any.   

Please specify desired weight.

I am planning to process my birds the weekend before Thanksgiving so they're fresh and ready for your table. 

I also plan to have them weighing about 11-20 lbs.

My asking price will be $2.99/lb.

That's a total price of $33-$60 depending on size.

 

Email me here: lorenfisk@thepoultryguy.com to make your order and ask any questions you might come up with.

I've been promising this, now I've delivered!

While conversing with potential customers at my farmer's market, I was frequently passed by because my chickens were not cut up.

I solved the issue and I want to unveil my new offerings. 

In my Farm Store, I now have all parts of the chicken conveniently separated and available.

I imagine this is important to you because it'll thaw out faster, you wont have to even lift a knife, and it'll cook faster too.  Talk about saving time!

Not only that, grilling my chickens just got a whole lot easier too.  Here's how I like to do it!

One thing that I haven't posted yet because I lack a decent picture, is soup stock bones.

If you just want to make your own chicken soup and get all the awesome flavors out of those bones, this 2.7 lb package is for you.

$3.85/lb is my asking price and some of those bones even have a little meat on them yet.

By the way, my little Use The Whole Chicken Cook Book (red button at bottom of page) will show you the very best recipe for chicken soup if you haven't checked it out yet.

My cut up chickens are all that's available through the summer now, I will have whole chickens available only directly after processing.  I'm thinking to have another batch ready in late August.

Taking a quick trip

On the 1st of May, Allison and I are headed to Missouri and we'll be gone about a week.

I've got a grazing school to go to (learning all kinds of cool things about healthy farming practices), and Allison will continue further south to visit her family.

Our plan is the swing up through IL on our way home to see some of my family.  Can you believe, I haven't met my little niece Elwynn yet and she was born way back in November!

Meanwhile, for those of you who ordered, your chickens are enjoying their first week in the outdoors! I moved them outside on the 28th of April.

I hope you're excited to see for yourself how my little chicken farm works, I want my customers to know exactly how things are going.

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Here's my plan for the year on how I will run my chicken sales.

If you want whole chickens(significantly cheaper), you need to order before I butcher. I do have a few left, if you're interested and haven't ordered yet.

I plan to turn any unsold birds into legs and thighs, wings, boneless skinless breast, and soup stock packages.  You are welcome to purchase your preferred parts anytime throughout the year so long as they are in stock. (I'm still working on pricing)

Remember: I will only have whole chickens for you if you pre-order and pick them up on the butcher date.

This is my new strategy trial for the year, hopefully it's one that really works out well for everybody.

I'm hoping to raise a second batch this fall, but I'm not guaranteeing it at this point.

Just another April snow day!

I made my chick brooder more weather proof before this snow and wind blew in.  I had some foam laying around that I used to insulate everything a little better.

I made my chick brooder more weather proof before this snow and wind blew in.  I had some foam laying around that I used to insulate everything a little better.

See? Warm and comfy!

See? Warm and comfy!

Looking for more handouts :D

Looking for more handouts :D

At least I didn't have to milk her 100% outside anyhow.

At least I didn't have to milk her 100% outside anyhow.

Kit is just trailing along as I do my chores.

Kit is just trailing along as I do my chores.

Elias was sleepin' hard when I walked in :) He wanted to go outside with me, but I don't think it'll happen today.

Elias was sleepin' hard when I walked in :) He wanted to go outside with me, but I don't think it'll happen today.

Allison tidying up the kitchen after breakfast, she's the best.

Allison tidying up the kitchen after breakfast, she's the best.

"Enjoying" the snow!

"Enjoying" the snow!

What is Pastured Poultry??

Let me answer your question! :-D

I raise my chickens out on pasture, hence Pastured Poultry. 

I can only raise them through the warmer months of the year because it gets too harsh and nasty out there in the winter.

The seasonal nature of my operation makes it tough for me to offer you my birds year 'round.  If you want chickens from me in the winter, I need you to buy a quantity for your freezer in the fall so you're stocked until spring.

I get my little chicks when they are days old and I keep them in a warm brooder with fresh wood shavings for 2-3 weeks depending on the weather.

On a nice sunshiny day, I move them to their outside pens.  It takes them a day or two to get used to their new situation, but they learn to pick through the plants and chase bugs before long.

My outdoor pens are called Chicken Tractors.  I move them to a fresh piece of ground every day to keep the birds clean and give them a new salad bar to pick through.

After 4-5 weeks on pasture, I harvest, package, and freeze them right here on my farm for you to take home and enjoy.

So far, I feed GMO corn and soybeans to my birds as it keeps my prices more affordable and it's easy to find a source.

If you want non-GMO fed poultry let me know, I would be happy to change things up if there are enough people asking for it.  Please be advised however, changes often increase expenses and therefore my prices.

My chickens keep very healthy when they're raised this way, I never have to use medications, hormones, or vaccinations ever.

My chickens are the cleanest, happiest, best cared for, and best tasting in South Dakota.  Try them out, you'll soon know what I'm talking about!

 

P.S.   If you want to be sure you'll get as many chickens as you want, contact me as early as possible. I order my first batch in early April, and my last batch by end of August. That's your yearly window to get chickens from me.

Eating animals, is there a difference?

I read a book recently that I found to be rather repulsive, disgusting, and quite eye opening.

Eating Animals was the title, written by Jonathan Safran Foer.

Jonathan reminded me of the importance of choosing to eat ethically raised animals verses animals that have been consistently abused.  He described in gory detail the issues surrounding Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations and the slaughtering plants that ultimately process animals for our consumption.

Perhaps a question that should be answered is how do I define animal abuse?

In my mind, I appreciate animals as God's creation, and as such, they play a very special role on this planet.  Does a pig perform his God given duty while residing on concrete slats hanging over a manure pit where air quality is horrible at best?  Do chickens get to obey their instincts in a barn that never allows sunlight, and they wallow in their own manure coated wood chips?

Animals denied fulfillment of their own specific nature are all you can find in Wal-mart, and there are only a few good options at Cobourns.  

In the name of "cheap" meat, we have, as a society, allowed CAFOs to exist and they're expanding even today.

Unfortunately, though this meat may be cheap on the store shelf, there are many hidden costs in the production of these animal products.

The environment suffers, employees suffer, and ultimately consumers suffer too.  CAFO meat is unhealthy on every level of production and consumption, this is becoming very well documented.

So please, take the time to find out how your meat reached your plate.  Every bite you take is influencing the world we live in, and that can be a good thing.

Next time, I'll share what I learned about slaughter plants from this book, Eating Animals. I'll tell you this: it's disturbing.

Already a year of changed plans

Back in December, Allison and I were certain that we'd be moving from Cavour to Carpenter as the next step up the ladder.  And, we thought we'd be there by the end of February.

Reality hit us as time passed faster than we got things accomplished, and we figured out that we'd be lucky to move by April.

Then suddenly, my father in-law Vaughn came up with a pile of work here on the family farm and needs help.  So for now it looks like we're staying at least one more year, perhaps longer depending on how things go.

So much for our grand scheme that we were so sure of just two months ago.  I've heard that life is full of changed plans, so I guess I'd better get used to it.

 

Continuing Education

Meanwhile, I received about 22 hours of Dr. Elaine Ingham recordings and have been listening to them as fast as I can.  I've nearly made it all the way through.

Elaine is a Soil Micro-Biologist and has discovered a multitude of really helpful information for farmers.  She says that putting biology (bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and nematodes) back in the soil (because it was mostly lost in the 1930's dust bowl) typically increases crop yields by 50-300%.

Not only is there higher production, but the nutritional quality is better too.

Since I'm a young man who needs a competitive edge in the agricultural world, learning her methods would be a major influence in putting my farm together.

I've determined that I need to take her courses and maybe even become a certified Soil Food Web consultant.  I've got to learn how to balance soils and make them healthy again by using nature's tools.

If I can get signed up by the 28th of February, I can save $2488 in tuition.  Their price for the four classes right now is $2500, and I need to find some financing.

If you would like to pitch in and help me out, give me a call and I'll gladly answer any questions you come up with.  (605) 350-5659

This is the website with the courses if you want to take a look for yourself: environmentcelebration.com

Thank you very much!

Phew, finally slowing down a bit!

Everything leading up to Thanksgiving weekend was crammed full of work, marketing, farm chores, travel preparations, etc...

I'm glad to be moving at a more relaxed pace now that we're getting somewhat settled in for winter.  That'll all change once we start packing and prepping for our move!

We're planning to relocate to Carpenter this winter, it looks like an advantageous location for my farm endeavors.

Ideally, next year I could stay home, work at building my little direct marketing farm, and live the family life.  Realistically, I have many more customers to find/serve before I can do that.

Which brings me to my winter's work:  Reaching out to help people like you find the healthy tasty meats they need.  

I think writing a simple little cook book featuring my little methods for getting great food on the table every evening, will be part of that work.

I may also publish my unique experience+reasons why I feel called to serve my friends and neighbors wholesome pastured meats.

So, stay tuned! If you're on my email list, I'll be in your inbox all winter with some things I really hope you find enjoyable/helpful.

 

P.S. Share this with your best friend ;-)