Meat

So thankful to be back

Friday night, I came home for the first time in almost 3 weeks.  Regular readers know that I was up in Rugby, North Dakota, the geographical center of North America, installing this gym floor at the Armory.

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Absence makes the heart grow fonder, I've heard, and it certainly seems true.  It was just so good to be back with my little family and spending time together again.

Elias getting ready to tear into some delicious grilled maple smoke chicken, and fresh tomatoes and zucchini from a neighbor that Allison sautéed.

Elias getting ready to tear into some delicious grilled maple smoke chicken, and fresh tomatoes and zucchini from a neighbor that Allison sautéed.

Isn't it crazy how fast you fall behind on things when you're not around for a while? I feel like it'll take me another 3 weeks to get everything in order again.

Which, by that time I'll be really close to processing my last batch of chickens for the year.

These guys were tiny little yellow fluff balls when I left, they change so quickly.

These guys were tiny little yellow fluff balls when I left, they change so quickly.

Poor Allison was taking care of Elias, her store, her marketing position for the Farmer's Market, attending two Farmer's Market events a week, tending my baby chicks in the brooder, and rotating my pigs through their slough.

Thankfully her mother could help out a bunch with the store and Elias, but still, Allison was absolutely swamped.

I'm very proud of my wife for keeping the ball rolling while I was gone, no one else could have handled everything so helpfully for me.

I love my family and my animals, being with them is just the best place to be. Don't you agree?

Finally, pictures and news of my little black hogs!

A bit over a month ago, my three sows gave birth to 21 baby pigs.  You should come out and see them sometime soon, they're the cutest little animals to ever scamper the earth.

Just to emphasis, come visit my little pigs, they're adorable and worth a trip. Send me a quick email to see when we're around, we're generally available in the evenings.

lorenfisk@thepoultryguy.com

Here's some pictures just in case you can't make it, but pictures never do justice to the real world.

This was that bright new morning when I walked out to the pig pen and discovered their arrival.  It's  one of the most enjoyable surprises I can think of.

This was that bright new morning when I walked out to the pig pen and discovered their arrival.  It's one of the most enjoyable surprises I can think of.

Fast forward about 5-6 weeks  and you can see how much they've grown compared to the picture above.

Fast forward about 5-6 weeks and you can see how much they've grown compared to the picture above.

I call this my Hog Sled. I just invented it so I could easily move my piggies here and there.   I dump some feed on the floor, they all pile in, and I shut the gate behind them.  It's really easy to motivate a pig.

I call this my Hog Sled. I just invented it so I could easily move my piggies here and there.  I dump some feed on the floor, they all pile in, and I shut the gate behind them. It's really easy to motivate a pig.

I just got them out into this area, I'm very excited about my new setup here.  They will reside in this little square for  up to a week before I rotate them to a fresh and clean area.

I just got them out into this area, I'm very excited about my new setup here.  They will reside in this little square for up to a week before I rotate them to a fresh and clean area.

This one wire is all I need to keep them where I want them.  It's electrified and my little hogs regard it with great respect after they get zapped once or twice.

This one wire is all I need to keep them where I want them.  It's electrified and my little hogs regard it with great respect after they get zapped once or twice.

If you have kids or grandkids, bring them out and take a look.  They need to see these little piglets in real life.

Looking to the Future

Recently I had a customer ask where I was intending to take my farming enterprise(s).  Such an open ended question is difficult for me to answer because there are so many options.

However, what I do know, is that I intend to produce what my customers are looking for.  Therefore, my farm will develop as consumer demand requires.  

There are other factors such as my own interest, feasibility, and timing.  But, I know that I must have consumer interest to sell my wares at a profit.  If I am profitable, then I can thrive as a business and the sky is the limit.  

So, what would you like me to grow/raise/produce? I am open to suggestions!